Savio

Atmospheric chemists use Savio to build computational gas emission models

Professor Ron Cohen and team

Ron Cohen, Professor of Chemistry and Earth and Planetary Sciences at UC Berkeley, and graduate students Alexis Shusterman, Josh Laughner, and visiting Harvard graduate student Alex Turner, are “trying to create a model of the world that matches the observations of the world.” That is, Cohen’s team is using sensor technology to measure the concentrations of atmospheric gases at both local and global scales, and from that data develop computational models that describe the emission processes and rates that cause those observations.

Aron D. Roberts's picture

Savio HPC cluster intermediate training on September 27, 2016

Savio training, 2 Aug 2016, AIS

An intermediate-level training session on the use of Savio and other Berkeley Research Computing high performance computing (HPC) clusters (Cortex and Vector) will be offered on Tuesday, September 27, 2016. If you’re a current or prospective user of one of these clusters, and already have some experience using HPC resources, you are invited to expand your skills via this free training.

Epidemiologists develop a computational tool to optimize study design

Screenshot, StudySimulator.com

Professor Jennifer Ahern of the School of Public Health, and two staff researchers, Masters of Public Health (MPH) Ellie Matthay and Scott Zimmerman, are developing a software tool called the Study Simulator, a web-based simulation generator that will allow investigators to identify optimal study designs and methods of analysis for research inquiries in Public Health and Epidemiology.

Undergraduate student uses Savio to perform Natural Language Processing on Fanfiction

Smitha Milli and David Bamman

Smitha Milli, a fourth year Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) undergraduate student at UC Berkeley, is collaborating with David Bamman, Assistant Professor at the Berkeley School of Information, to perform Natural Language Processing (NLP) on fanfiction texts.

BRC program supports neutron transport research and advanced nuclear reactor design

Fission source distribution of a hexagonal array of UO2 pins in water calculated by WARP software.

To assess the stability and safety of proposed nuclear reactor designs, UC Berkeley nuclear engineers utilize the campus High Performance Computing (HPC) cluster, Savio, to predictively model the pathways of neutrons as they collide with atoms in the nuclear fuel. Kelly Rowland, a PhD student in Professor Rachel Slaybaugh’s lab, and a domain consultant with Berkeley Research Computing (BRC), develops and tests computational methods for simulating neutron motion.

Steve Masover's picture

BRC Program receives NSF grant for Cyberinfrastructure Engineer

NSF site announcement of CI Engineer award to UC Berkeley

A Cyberinfrastructure Engineer funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF)  will soon begin to help researchers adapt and scale research workflows to take advantage of campus cyberinfrastructure including the Berkeley Research Computing (BRC) resources, the Science DMZ and associated high-speed networking, and high-speed data transfer tools. The position will be funded by an ACI Campus Cyberinfrastructure (CC-NIE) grant awarded by the NSF in December 2015, and will augment the BRC Program’s staff.

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