Savio

Visualizing Digital Scholarship at UC Berkeley — Communities, Content, and Services

Image of Dr. Lucarelli inspecting sarcophagus

UC Berkeley has recently embraced immersive visualization in the classroom, in research, and for public engagement.  While this extends across all campus disciplines and a number of technologies, a growing community is using photogrammetry to develop 3D visualizations of objects and places, both as digital documentation to answer new questions inextricably linked to materiality.  Dr.

Steve Masover's picture

Legal scholars mining millions of bankruptcy case pages

Professors Ken Ayotte (Berkeley Law) and Jared Ellias (UC Hastings School of Law)

Large corporate bankruptcy cases don’t easily lend themselves to empirical research, according to UC Berkeley Law Professor Ken Ayotte, because “sample sizes are small, and the financial data that’s available on the company leading up to bankruptcy is usually sparse and unreliable. We know when the company files, we have some basic background information about it, and we see whether the company reorganizes or liquidates at the end of the case, but we know very little about what happens during the case to drive those outcomes.”

Erica Chen's picture

Climate Impact Lab: measuring the social cost of climate change

Floodplain for Miami, FL (map); Hsiang, Kopp, Jina, Rising, et al. (2017)

How might one measure the social cost of carbon? This is the question that brought more than 20 climate scientists, economists, data analysts, engineers, and researchers together at the Climate Impact Lab (CIL). With members from UC Berkeley, the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago, the Rhodium Group, and Rutgers University, the Lab formed out of an assessment that it is critically necessary to understand how climate change affects the United States in social and economic terms.

Quinn Dombrowski's picture

Scientific Linux 7 coming to BRC clusters

Scientific Linux logo and wordmark

Berkeley Research Computing staff are preparing for a major upgrade to the high performance computing clusters (Savio, Vector, and Cortex) that will replace the aging Scientific Linux 6 operating system with version 7, which offers many new and frequently-requested software packages. While the clusters have been running Scientific Linux 6 since the beginning of the Berkeley Research Computing program, it is quickly reaching its end-of-life, making an upgrade essential.

Erica Chen's picture

Seismologist processes earthquake waveforms recorded by smartphones on multiple platforms

MyShake users across the globe

Growing up in Anyang, in a central region of China greatly impacted by earthquakes, Qingkai Kong was inspired to do research in seismology precisely because earthquakes are serious natural hazards that affect communities worldwide. Berkeley’s proximity to the Hayward Fault influenced his decision to complete his graduate studies under Richard Allen at the UC Berkeley Seismology Lab.

Erica Chen's picture

Research IT Staff Present at UC Berkeley CaVraCon

3D model of Egyptian sarcophagus constructed using photogrammetry software

Emerging image technologies took digital humanities to new heights in this year’s statewide CaVraCon [1], the biennial California Visual Resources Association Conference, which is affiliated with the Visual Resources Association. Librarians, archivists, and scholars gathered at UC Berkeley to discuss developments and issues in the field of image and media management.

Steve Masover's picture

Singularity on Savio: containerized applications and mobility of computation

Singularity workflow, image credit: singularity.lbl.gov

Singularity is an emerging software tool that facilitates the movement of software applications and workflows between computational environments -- from a researcher’s laptop, to Berkeley’s high-performance computing cluster, Savio, to XSEDE’s national-scale clusters (e.g., Jetstream, Comet) or

ESPM postdoc crosses 150 years of observational biology with satellite data to mitigate biodiversity loss

Paul Elsen, postdoctoral scholar, UC Berkeley Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management

Graduating from UC Berkeley as a cognitive science major in 2006, conservation biologist Paul Elsen would have never guessed that he would return to Berkeley a decade later to become a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management. Following completion of his M.A. and Ph.D in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Princeton University, Elsen returned to the West Coast and is now a David H.

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