Researcher Profile

BRC Supports Biostatisticians in Effort to Develop Software for Traumatic Injury Treatment and Outcome Predictions

Alan Hubbard and research group colleagues, Jan 2017

What do the Phanerozoic eon and Precision Medicine have in common? For one thing: the statistical analyses of Alan Hubbard, UC Berkeley Associate Professor of Biostatistics, and head of the Division of Biostatistics at the School of Public Health.

Systems Neuroscientists use BRC services to understand the neural basis of perception

Evan Lyall

A childhood filled with Lego blocks, nature documentaries, science fiction novels, and some amazing science teachers led Evan Lyall to know that he wanted to study Bioengineering in college, but left him unsure of the direction he should go with that training.

Savio supports Doudna Lab biophysicist’s investigation of human protein production

Stephen Floor

“I have always believed in following the science,” says Stephen Floor, a postdoctoral researcher in the Doudna Lab, led by UC Berkeley Professor of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology, Jennifer Doudna. Floor’s self-described “circuitous” academic journey has taken him from computer science, to physics, and now, to molecular biology.

Atmospheric chemists use Savio to build computational gas emission models

Professor Ron Cohen and team

Ron Cohen, Professor of Chemistry and Earth and Planetary Sciences at UC Berkeley, and graduate students Alexis Shusterman, Josh Laughner, and visiting Harvard graduate student Alex Turner, are “trying to create a model of the world that matches the observations of the world.” That is, Cohen’s team is using sensor technology to measure the concentrations of atmospheric gases at both local and global scales, and from that data develop computational models that describe the emission processes and rates that cause those observations.

Epidemiologists develop a computational tool to optimize study design

Screenshot, StudySimulator.com

Professor Jennifer Ahern of the School of Public Health, and two staff researchers, Masters of Public Health (MPH) Ellie Matthay and Scott Zimmerman, are developing a software tool called the Study Simulator, a web-based simulation generator that will allow investigators to identify optimal study designs and methods of analysis for research inquiries in Public Health and Epidemiology.

Undergraduate student uses Savio to perform Natural Language Processing on Fanfiction

Smitha Milli and David Bamman

Smitha Milli, a fourth year Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) undergraduate student at UC Berkeley, is collaborating with David Bamman, Assistant Professor at the Berkeley School of Information, to perform Natural Language Processing (NLP) on fanfiction texts.

Theoretical chemists use Savio to build molecular computational models

Eric Neuscamman

“Well, I’m not safe near real chemicals,” says UC Berkeley Professor Eric Neuscamman, a theoretical chemist working to develop increasingly accurate and computationally cost-effective methods of modeling electron behavior in molecules. To inform chemists’ experimentation, theoretical chemists use supercomputers to solve complex mathematical equations, including the Schrödinger equation, that yield predictive models of what molecules will do in chemical reactions.

BRC program supports neutron transport research and advanced nuclear reactor design

Fission source distribution of a hexagonal array of UO2 pins in water calculated by WARP software.

To assess the stability and safety of proposed nuclear reactor designs, UC Berkeley nuclear engineers utilize the campus High Performance Computing (HPC) cluster, Savio, to predictively model the pathways of neutrons as they collide with atoms in the nuclear fuel. Kelly Rowland, a PhD student in Professor Rachel Slaybaugh’s lab, and a domain consultant with Berkeley Research Computing (BRC), develops and tests computational methods for simulating neutron motion.

BRC Program supports Astrophysicists’ research on black holes

Alexander (Sasha) Tchekhovskoy, UC Berkeley

Berkeley astrophysicists harnessed the campus supercomputing cluster, Savio, to make important advances in understanding how black holes behave. Working with Berkeley Research Computing (BRC) staff to tune their software to the Savio environment, Alexander Tchekhovskoy was able to produce findings published in six journal articles even in the face of unanticipated restrictions in his allocation on nationally-run supercomputing infrastructure.