Researcher Profile

Erica Chen's picture

Seismologist processes earthquake waveforms recorded by smartphones on multiple platforms

MyShake users across the globe

Growing up in Anyang, in a central region of China greatly impacted by earthquakes, Qingkai Kong was inspired to do research in seismology precisely because earthquakes are serious natural hazards that affect communities worldwide. Berkeley’s proximity to the Hayward Fault influenced his decision to complete his graduate studies under Richard Allen at the UC Berkeley Seismology Lab.

Steve Masover's picture

Prof. Rachel Slaybaugh optimizes next-generation nuclear reactor design on BRC’s Savio cluster

Rachel Slaybaugh

It was her inner environmentalist that lured Asst. Professor Rachel Slaybaugh to Nuclear Engineering. “I have always been an environmentalist,” she explained. “When I was a freshman at Penn State I heard about this existing, large-scale, base load electricity source that didn’t emit air pollution, and I thought -- well, that sounds like a great way to get rid of coal plants -- I’m going to do that.” What Slaybaugh had heard about was nuclear power, which led to her B.S. in Nuclear Engineering from Penn State, then a Master’s and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Notebook environments support Prof. Carl Boettiger's ecosystem modeling and data sharing

Asst. Prof. Carl Boettiger; photo credit: Paul Krichner

As a physics student at Princeton University, Assistant Professor Carl Boettiger had no intention of working with computers: he says he was essentially “pulled in by accident.” During his time as an undergraduate, Boettiger gradually broadened his interests from physics, which he believed to be the type of science done solely on a chalkboard, to biophysics and ecology.

ESPM postdoc crosses 150 years of observational biology with satellite data to mitigate biodiversity loss

Paul Elsen, postdoctoral scholar, UC Berkeley Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management

Graduating from UC Berkeley as a cognitive science major in 2006, conservation biologist Paul Elsen would have never guessed that he would return to Berkeley a decade later to become a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management. Following completion of his M.A. and Ph.D in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Princeton University, Elsen returned to the West Coast and is now a David H.

Digital Humanist aims to run OCR over a terabyte of rare book scans

Adam Anderson, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Digital Humanities

Since his college days at Brigham Young University (BYU), Adam Anderson has been measuring evenings and weekends in pages, rather than hours. “You can scan about 400 pages an hour, once you get in the groove,” he explains. Anderson, a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at UC Berkeley, has spent his career scanning texts in order to draw upon secondary literature in archaeology and computational linguistics.

BRC Supports Biostatisticians in Effort to Develop Software for Traumatic Injury Treatment and Outcome Predictions

Alan Hubbard and research group colleagues, Jan 2017

What do the Phanerozoic eon and Precision Medicine have in common? For one thing: the statistical analyses of Alan Hubbard, UC Berkeley Associate Professor of Biostatistics, and head of the Division of Biostatistics at the School of Public Health.

Systems Neuroscientists use BRC services to understand the neural basis of perception

Evan Lyall

A childhood filled with Lego blocks, nature documentaries, science fiction novels, and some amazing science teachers led Evan Lyall to know that he wanted to study Bioengineering in college, but left him unsure of the direction he should go with that training.

Savio supports Doudna Lab biophysicist’s investigation of human protein production

Stephen Floor

“I have always believed in following the science,” says Stephen Floor, a postdoctoral researcher in the Doudna Lab, led by UC Berkeley Professor of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology, Jennifer Doudna. Floor’s self-described “circuitous” academic journey has taken him from computer science, to physics, and now, to molecular biology.

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