Digital Humanities

Digital Humanist aims to run OCR over a terabyte of rare book scans

Adam Anderson, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Digital Humanities

Since his college days at Brigham Young University (BYU), Adam Anderson has been measuring evenings and weekends in pages, rather than hours. “You can scan about 400 pages an hour, once you get in the groove,” he explains. Anderson, a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at UC Berkeley, has spent his career scanning texts in order to draw upon secondary literature in archaeology and computational linguistics.

Research IT Staff Present at UCLA Digital Humanities Infrastructure Symposium

Texture model and Jupyter notebook

Librarian-led research incubators, e-portfolios for promotion and tenure, content creation for visualization walls, and bulk OCR using a high performance computing (HPC) cluster shared the stage at UCLA on February 23rd for the second Digital Humanities Infrastructure Symposium. Organized by UCLA’s Center for Digital Humanities, the symposium drew together librarians, researchers, instructors, and IT staff from throughout the region for a day of presentations and discussions, centered on a broad definition of “infrastructure.”

Go from Analog to Digital Texts with OCR

An early modern text (English)

A collection of digitized texts marks the start of a research project —  or does it?

For many social sciences and humanities researchers, creating searchable, editable, and machine-readable digital texts out of heaps of paper in archival boxes or from books painstakingly sourced from overlooked corners of the library can be a tedious, time-consuming process.

Semantic Network Analysis and Cuneiform Intellectual History

Eduardo Escobar (right foreground) and Laurie Pearce (left foreground) at DHBSI, August 2015

For Eduardo Escobar, a PhD student in the Near Eastern Studies department, technology provides both a key theoretical concept and a set of practical tools for his dissertation on cuneiform “recipes” from between the second and first millennium BCE. These “recipes” are documents that share a predictable structure for transmitting procedural knowledge from an expert to a novice.

Love Your Data Week: February 8-12, 2016

Love Your Data banner

Love Your Data Week is a nationwide campaign designed to raise awareness about research data management, sharing, and preservation. Activities and events will be held from February 8th-12th, 2016 to promote data management awareness. Follow the conversation at #LYD16.

Two data management events will be held in the library during this week:

Research websites launch with hosting from Digital Humanities Program

Screenshots from sites hosted by the Digital Humanities Program

The Digital Humanities at Berkeley program, a partnership between the Dean of Arts and Humanities and Research IT, has recently launched three websites that disseminate the research and/or pedagogy of faculty members engaged in digital humanities. While website hosting is not a common-good service provided by IST, researchers involved with the digital humanities program have indicated that web hosting is essential infrastructure for their work.

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UCB Research IT participates in NSF-sponsored ACI-REF workshop

UC Berkeley’s Research IT group was invited to participate in the ARCC Workshop hosted by Clemson University in March of this year. The workshop was presented in partnership with the NSF-sponsored program for Advanced Cyberinfrastructure Research and Education Facilitators (ACI-REF) and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA).

Undergraduate team wins #HackFSM hackathon

On CalDay, in the oldest building on campus, undergraduate Cassie Xiong stepped to the microphone and introduced a new tool for understanding what many consider the defining event in UC Berkeley history. Xiong, an Interdisciplinary Studies Major and OCIO Communications intern, described her team’s design for a modern entryway to the Bancroft Library’s Free Speech Movement Digital Archive.

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