consulting

Aaron Culich's picture

Sociology research on climate change reporting accelerated by AEoD virtual environments

Newspapers in a rack in Lisbon, Portugal. Photo credit: Harshil Shah, via Wikimedia Commons (Creative Commons License CC BY-SA 2.0)

Increasingly, the scale of data analysis means that computation can no longer be carried out on a laptop — often the only resource easily available to researchers. And while the Berkeley Research Computing (BRC) Program offers many powerful resources to researchers, it’s not always clear where to get started.

Epidemiologists develop a computational tool to optimize study design

Screenshot, StudySimulator.com

Professor Jennifer Ahern of the School of Public Health, and two staff researchers, Masters of Public Health (MPH) Ellie Matthay and Scott Zimmerman, are developing a software tool called the Study Simulator, a web-based simulation generator that will allow investigators to identify optimal study designs and methods of analysis for research inquiries in Public Health and Epidemiology.

BRC program supports neutron transport research and advanced nuclear reactor design

Fission source distribution of a hexagonal array of UO2 pins in water calculated by WARP software.

To assess the stability and safety of proposed nuclear reactor designs, UC Berkeley nuclear engineers utilize the campus High Performance Computing (HPC) cluster, Savio, to predictively model the pathways of neutrons as they collide with atoms in the nuclear fuel. Kelly Rowland, a PhD student in Professor Rachel Slaybaugh’s lab, and a domain consultant with Berkeley Research Computing (BRC), develops and tests computational methods for simulating neutron motion.

Pages