brc

Epidemiologists develop a computational tool to optimize study design

Screenshot, StudySimulator.com

Professor Jennifer Ahern of the School of Public Health, and two staff researchers, Masters of Public Health (MPH) Ellie Matthay and Scott Zimmerman, are developing a software tool called the Study Simulator, a web-based simulation generator that will allow investigators to identify optimal study designs and methods of analysis for research inquiries in Public Health and Epidemiology.

Undergraduate student uses Savio to perform Natural Language Processing on Fanfiction

Smitha Milli and David Bamman

Smitha Milli, a fourth year Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) undergraduate student at UC Berkeley, is collaborating with David Bamman, Assistant Professor at the Berkeley School of Information, to perform Natural Language Processing (NLP) on fanfiction texts.

Aron D. Roberts's picture

Savio HPC cluster introductory training on August 2, 2016

Savio screenshot - available software modules

New and prospective users of Savio and other Berkeley Research Computing high performance computing (HPC) clusters (Cortex and Vector) are invited to attend an introductory training session on Tuesday, August 2, 2016. Topics will include a system overview and a review of basic cluster usage, such as logging in, accessing software, running jobs, and transferring files.

Theoretical chemists use Savio to build molecular computational models

Eric Neuscamman

“Well, I’m not safe near real chemicals,” says UC Berkeley Professor Eric Neuscamman, a theoretical chemist working to develop increasingly accurate and computationally cost-effective methods of modeling electron behavior in molecules. To inform chemists’ experimentation, theoretical chemists use supercomputers to solve complex mathematical equations, including the Schrödinger equation, that yield predictive models of what molecules will do in chemical reactions.

BRC program supports neutron transport research and advanced nuclear reactor design

Fission source distribution of a hexagonal array of UO2 pins in water calculated by WARP software.

To assess the stability and safety of proposed nuclear reactor designs, UC Berkeley nuclear engineers utilize the campus High Performance Computing (HPC) cluster, Savio, to predictively model the pathways of neutrons as they collide with atoms in the nuclear fuel. Kelly Rowland, a PhD student in Professor Rachel Slaybaugh’s lab, and a domain consultant with Berkeley Research Computing (BRC), develops and tests computational methods for simulating neutron motion.

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