Berkeley Research Computing

Steve Masover's picture

Enabling cars to see at Berkeley DeepDrive

Lazar Supic

How computers see is the through-line running from Lazar Supic’s Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering at the University of Belgrade, to his UC Berkeley PhD in Nuclear Engineering, to his current work as a Postdoc in UC Berkeley’s DeepDrive Industry Consortium (BDD). His work has taken a path that began with computer vision in robots, moved to gamma-ray tracking in atomic reactions, and now focuses on machine learning for automotive perception.

Steve Masover's picture

Legal scholars mining millions of bankruptcy case pages

Professors Ken Ayotte (Berkeley Law) and Jared Ellias (UC Hastings School of Law)

Large corporate bankruptcy cases don’t easily lend themselves to empirical research, according to UC Berkeley Law Professor Ken Ayotte, because “sample sizes are small, and the financial data that’s available on the company leading up to bankruptcy is usually sparse and unreliable. We know when the company files, we have some basic background information about it, and we see whether the company reorganizes or liquidates at the end of the case, but we know very little about what happens during the case to drive those outcomes.”

Erica Chen's picture

Climate Impact Lab: measuring the social cost of climate change

Floodplain for Miami, FL (map); Hsiang, Kopp, Jina, Rising, et al. (2017)

How might one measure the social cost of carbon? This is the question that brought more than 20 climate scientists, economists, data analysts, engineers, and researchers together at the Climate Impact Lab (CIL). With members from UC Berkeley, the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago, the Rhodium Group, and Rutgers University, the Lab formed out of an assessment that it is critically necessary to understand how climate change affects the United States in social and economic terms.

Aaron Culich's picture

2017 Binder workshop at UC Davis

Binder (screenshot)

UC Berkeley’s Research IT group was invited to participate in the 2017 Binder workshop hosted at UC Davis in October of last year. The workshop’s goal was to “enhance and extend the functionality of the binder notebook computing platform,” and specifically “ to brainstorm and prototype support for credentials so that private resources can be used to source and execute binders (on, e.g., AWS accounts and private repositories).”

Erica Chen's picture

Botanist finds a bioinformatic home in Savio

Ingrid Jordon-Thaden gathering specimens

Before her research led to an appointment as a Research Botanist at The University and Jepson Herbaria at UC Berkeley, Ingrid Jordon-Thaden graduated from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the University of Heidelberg, Germany. When she left Heidelberg, she took with her not only a PhD, but also the beginnings of her research on the genetic history of the genus Draba, in the mustard family.

Erica Chen's picture

Gallant Lab neuroscientists map the human brain using OpenStack and Amazon S3

The Gallant Lab's "Brain Viewer " (screenshot)

How might matter give rise to subjective experience? This question helps drive the Gallant Lab at UC Berkeley to find explanations to the mysteries of neuroscience. The Gallant Lab focuses much of its research on functional cartography of the brain, mapping areas of the brain that are involved in cognitive or motor functions.

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